The great decoupling- how should we respond to keep ahead

Looking into this “The great decoupling” interview, the main takes for me were:

“…

McAfee: We’ll continue to see the middle class hollowed out and will see growth at the low and high ends. Really good executives, entrepreneurs, investors, and novelists—they will all reap rewards. Yo-Yo Ma won’t be replaced by a robot anytime soon, but financially, I wouldn’t want to be the world’s 100th-best cellist.

What kind of economic environment would make the best use of the new digital technologies?

McAfee: One that’s conducive to innovation, new business formation, and economic growth. To create it, we need to focus on five things:
The first is education. Primary and secondary education systems should be teaching relevant and valuable skills, which means things computers are not good at. These include creativity, interpersonal skills, and problem solving.
The second is infrastructure. World-class roads, airports, and networks are investments in the future and the foundations of growth.
Third, we need more entrepreneurship. Young businesses, especially fast-growing ones, are a prime source of new jobs. But most industries and regions are seeing fewer new companies than they did three decades ago.
A fourth focus is immigration. Many of the world’s most talented people come to America to build lives and careers, and there’s clear evidence that immigrant-founded companies have been great job-creation engines. The current policies in this area are far too restrictive, and our procedures are nightmarishly bureaucratic.
The fifth thing is basic research. Companies tend to concentrate on applied research, which means that the government has a role to play in supporting original early-stage research. Most of today’s tech marvels, from the internet to the smartphone, have a government program somewhere in their family tree. Funding for basic research in America, though, is on the decline: Both total and nondefense federal R&D spending, as percentages of GDP, have declined by more than a third since 1980. That must change….”

My note: Assisting the low income citizens will not be an option – it will and is a necessity for stability and growth of society as a whole.

Disaster Recovery in just $200? Watch this “On-Premise DR, assisted by Amazon AWS” session

I think this one is a “Watch ASAP” for Enterprise IT Professionals who are looking for ways to cut on the time and effort spent on their On-Premise DR (Disaster Recovery) project, and are open to use Amazon AWS for that purpose.

Watch the gradual build up of your DR solution enhancement by using a simple backup to S3 or Glacier and into parallel multi region automated solutions.

This is NOT a “fully figured out cut for you” solution, but it takes you gently into the realm of DR, cloud assisted solutions, and should be a nice brainstorming source to look into your specific case.

Near the end it kind of mentions my “Nano Self Rebuilding Data Center” idea (basically allowing any AWS based project to be turned into a script that can be used to rebuild it, like AWS Config on steroids…)

IMG_3715

OS X and iOS Unauthorized Cross Application Resource Access (XARA)

This is about rouge apps that preset the environment that other mass used apps will need once activated. Those rouge apps can later hook to those resources, having unauthorized access due to the fact they initiated the creation of the place holder for those resources.

The iOS sandbox protection mechanism can’t yet block this vulnerability.

This becomes very unsettling if you consider your iOS and OSx keychain password store can be exposed as well…

Read more on how this works and how to mitigate the risk. Basically avoid installing apps from

https://isc.sans.edu/diary/OS+X+and+iOS+Unauthorized+Cross+Application+Resource+Access+%28XARA%29/19815

Why Best Firms develop their Digital IQ, and how You can start doing it Right Now

Crazy Idea: Duolc, StretchOS and what Gazzilion Apps Really want [!OpenStack]

Yes, I am a DevOps, Big Data, Security kind of guy and I use Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure and OpenStack, as well as other smaller players. But I like to take a new diverse, contrarian look at stuff the Cloud community seem to have kind of pre-determined agreement.

I am sitting at the OpenStack conference and learning about the cool news ways it can give you an edge. I believe that Open Source and OpenStack is at the heart of getting an edge. You need mature, fully supported vendor based platforms. But you also need at some points to move fast, faster, fastest. At that edge point Open Source and Open Stack are the tools you want to use.Those “free” toys, do have a cost spent in learning curves, education, cultural change and efforts to workaround cases of immaturity. When they mature, they join your base tool set as other new roughly edged opportunities arise.

However, looking at Cloud platforms, it is clear what they ask for are applications that can be spread across many computing nodes. Most of the current applications enterprises use are not set for the cloud.

While everyone in the Cloud Community is expecting the Enterprise to re-write or convert their applications to the cloud, Enterprises naturally just want the job done.

What the “Legacy” applications want is “Duolc” (“Cloud” spelled in reverse) deployed on “StretchOS”.

So “StretchOS“, a term I just made up, should be able to group a bunch of resources and make it so it behaves as a unified single operating system running on a single computer. The CPU, Memory, Disk and Network resources will be highly available and processes will be able to be served on any of the computing resources.

I am not aware of someone developing something such as “StretchOS”, but looking at the vast amount of applications that could immediately and effortlessly benefit of such a solution should attract a close look of entrepreneurs. This could be a cross-gap solution until most of the apps become cloud-enabled.

Now, as I dumped this crazy concept on your desk, I can go back to my Cloud deployments..